Nature education on the Sallandse Heuvelrug. A voyage of discovery for young and old.
Bertine Kleinjan
Written by Bertine Kleinjan
2 min
1011 x read

‘Everybody is an outdoor person’. A connection with nature is fashionable again, essential even. But above all, a day on the Sallandse Heuvelrug is fun. Children don’t notice how untypically Dutch these surroundings are. They notice the amazing things to do and discover: great for getting rid of some of that extra energy. In the meantime, there is plenty of time for awe and wonder: Why is the forest green? Where do rabbits sleep? Do gnomes exist after all?

Wandering in wonder

Luckily, the answers reveal mostly themselves. Treasure hunts, handbooks, pointed hats and knapsacks; there is a fascinating adventure for everyone. Just navigating from post to post is fun, the extra questions and tasks make it super exciting! You can also learn to make a birdbox or become a forest ranger’s assistant.

Big bad wolf

Are the kids still moaning about being ‘bored’? They won’t be bored hanging upside down from monkey bars, climbing or building dens. Is it raining cats and dogs? The nature diorama - a recreation of nature - features large and lifelike wild animals. The wolf is back too! He’s not as big and bad as in the Little Red Riding Hood fairy-tale.

Useful

There are three visitor’s centres that serve as a starting point for exploring the Sallandse Heuvelrug. Parking is free. Dogs are welcome, as long as they are on a leash. There is a small charge for the discovery tour/treasure hunt packs and a deposit is required in some cases. The starting points for the activities and routes (buggy-proof and less than 5 km) are always nearby. Check the current here. Once you are finished playing and discovering, with rosy cheeks from the fresh air, stop for a cup of coffee before your journey home. You will always find a space and a warm welcome at one of the restaurants and cafes.

Tip:

If you are planning a visit for the end of summer, you’re right in time for lovely ripe berries. Picking the berries is allowed, but only above knee height: This way you can be certain that no wild animals have peed on them.

Bertine Kleinjan
Bertine Kleinjan
Written byBertine Kleinjan

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